Group I: Ph.D.-granting programs


A * indicates an institution also listed on the APA CSW report. (This links launches a pdf.)
A ^ indicates an institution also listed on the Philosophical Gourmet site on the page, "Breakdown of Programs by Specialty: Other Areas of Philosophy: Feminist Philosophy.")

Group I: Ph.D.-granting programs
Binghamton University*
Dalhousie University*
Loyola University*
Massachusetts Institute of Technology* ^
McGill University*
Michigan State University*
Northwestern University
Queen’s University ^
Stanford University* ^
SUNY Stony Brook* ^
Syracuse University ^
University of Alberta* ^
University of Connecticut -- Storrs* ^
University of Georgia
University of Kentucky*
University of Memphis*
University of Minnesota* ^
UNC-Chapel Hill*
University of Oregon*
University of Sheffield* ^
University of Western Ontario* ^
University of Wisconsin ^
Washington University* ^
York University



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Binghamton University*


The Philosophy department at Binghamton University offers a specialized MA/Ph.D program in Social, Political, Ethical and Legal Philosophy (SPEL). This program is very feminist friendly. Faculty doing feminist work include the chair of the department, Bat-Ami Bar On (feminist political philosophy, democratic theory, violence, Arendt), the director of graduate studies, Lisa Tessman (ethics, feminist ethics and social theory, critical race theory), Melissa Zinkin (Kant, history of philosophy, feminist theory and aesthetics), and Anna Gotlib (bio-medical ethics, feminist ethics, normative ethics, philosophy of law). Other faculty members are familiar with and supportive of feminist work. The department is strong in both the Anglo-American (analytic) and Continental traditions, and offers some non-Western philosophy. Students may also work with other feminist philosophers and other feminist scholars at the University. Many graduate students study feminist philosophy and write dissertations on feminist topics. Students may also earn a graduate certificate in Feminist Theory alongside their degree in Philosophy.

Dalhousie University*


Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S., Canada, offers M.A. and PhD programs and is very receptive to feminist projects. Faculty members with explicitly feminist research interests include Francoise Baylis (bioethics), Sue Campbell (philosophy of the emotions, aesthetics, race), Trish Glazebrook (ecofeminism, Heidegger, phil of technology), Letitia Meynell (feminist epistemology, aesthetics, phil of science), and Susan Sherwin (feminist health ethics,ethics, social and political phil.), and recent emeritus Richmond Cambell (political philosophy, ethics, and naturalized feminist epistemology).

Loyola University*


Loyola University, in Chicago, is feminist-friendly -- dept. has a strong emphasis in Continental, ethics -- and some history of phil; we currently have 5 women working in feminist areas (or overlapping areas): Patricia Huntington (cont'l phil., Irigaray), Jennifer Parks (fem ethics), Jackie Scott (Nietzsche& fem'ism, race theory) Heidi Malm (ethics), and me, Julie Ward (Ancient, Beauvoir). There are also fem friendly male colleagues like Dave Ingram (critical theory) and Dave Schweickart (pol. phil. Marxism).

McGill University*


McGill U.: there are presently two philosophers on faculty who do research in or teach feminism: Marguerite Deslauriers (ancient philosophy, feminist political theory) and Alia Al-Saji (French feminism, feminist theory informed/informing race theory).

Michigan State University*


Michigan State U. *Notes: Strength in feminist philosophy. Four faculty members do feminist philosophy here: Lisa Schwartzman, work in political theory and related fields; Hilde Lindemann, editor of HYPATIA, work in ethics, medical ethics, other "applied" ethics; Marilyn Frye, language, ontology, radical feminism; Judy Andre, ethics, health care, value theory; Jim Nelson, bioethics, moral theory, family; and two more faculty members are women: Debra Nails (ancient) and Jennifer Susse (metaphysics and philosophy of mind), both feminists, though not doing feminist philosophy as such. Two people do race theory, and people in interdisciplinary work related to ecology, health care, biological sciences, food and agriculture, development. It's a very politically progressive department, with plenty of support for feminist philosophy.

MIT

Rae Langton and Sally Haslanger are the two regular women faculty in the Department Of Linguistics And Philosophy (out of 11) and Judith Thomson, although retired, is very active. The department is entirely analytic, but 50% of our grad students are women (17 men, 17 women, and recently we had an incoming class that was entirely women). We also host the very successful Workshop on Gender and Philosophy which meets monthly during the academic year and provides an important venue for feminist faculty in New England to present work in progress. Admittedly, we are a very small department and are narrowly specialized in analytic philosophy. But we are well-known among mainly analytic departments for our success in creating a woman-friendly and feminist-friendly atmosphere. This is not a small accomplishment and it is important to let prospective grad students know that some analytic departments are very strong in analytic feminism and welcome women graduate students.

Northwestern University


Northwestern U. Notes: Penelope Deutscher on faculty

Queen’s University ^


Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada (contributed by Christine Overall) The Department has a large proportion of women. Out of about eighteen permanent, cross-appointed, and adjunct faculty members, eight are women. Second, a number are engaged in feminist philosophy. Others who do some feminist philosophy include Susan Babbitt, Christine Sypnowich, and Jackie Davies. The Department is very strong in ethics and political philosophy, and most members of the Department are open to and interested in feminist work.

Stanford University* ^


Stanford University, Modern Thought and Literature program]* ^Notes: MTL is an interdisciplinary PhD program, but it has a strong relationship with philosophy. Described as extremely supportive of feminist graduate work. Faculty includes Debra Satz and Helen Longino.

SUNY Stony Brook* ^


SUNY Stony Brook's * ^ Philosophy Department offers Graduate Certificates in Art and Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Women's Studies, and Advanced Study in Literature and Philosophy. Eva Kittay and Mary Rawlinson are on faculty. Many of the male professors are both open to and knowledgeable of feminist philosophy, e.g. Eduardo Mendieta & Lorenzo Simpson; Lee Miller directed Susan Bordo's dissertation. Rita Nolan has, over the years, taught all the feminist philosophy courses that are cross-listed with Women's Studies, and other Women's Studies courses, and has published work in cognition, psychology, and language which is always written with a view to its compatibility and enhancement of feminist philosophical themes and goals (even if these are not explicitly mentioned).


Syracuse University ^


Two feminist philosophers are in the department, Linda Martín Alcoff, who focuses on feminist epistemology, continental philosophy and critical, race theory, and Ishani Maitra, a recent student of Sally Halslanger's who focuses on philosophy of language and also teaches philosophy of law. Also in the department is Michael Stocker, who has worked on philosophy of the emotions, and other philosophers who are feminist friendly.

University of Alberta* ^


Faculty at University of Alberta include Cressida Heyes, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Gender and Sexuality http://www.cressidaheyes.com. For what it's worth, the department is ranked in group 2 for feminist philosophy by the Leiter Report, and hopes to build on this strength through further hiring. There is a small but strong community of graduate students working in feminist philosophy. Janet Wesselius works at the university's Augustana Campus in feminist epistemology, and there is a significant community of feminist theoretical scholars in other departments at the University--most notably Political Science and English and Film Studies.

University of Connecticut* ^


Faculty members at University of Connecticut -- Storrs include Diana Tietjens Meyers, who specializes in ethics, feminist theory, and social and political philosophy, and Serena Parekh, who specializes in social and political philosophy, philosophy of human rights, continental philosophy, feminist theory and the history of philosophy, including Hannah Arendt's theory of human rights. The Women's Studies Program offers a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies, which philosophy PhD students can take to complete an outside field requirement.

University of Georgia


The Department of Philosophy at the University of Georgia offers both MA and Ph. D. programs in Philosophy. It is highly supportive of work in feminist philosophy. The faculty of 13 tenured and tenure-track professors includes five women. The department Head is Professor Victoria Davion (Ph. D University of Wisconsin - Madison), editor of the journal Ethics & the Environment. Davion’s primary interests include feminist philosophy, environmental philosophy, ethics and social and political philosophy. Professor of Philosophy Chris Cuomo (Ph. D University of Wisconsin­- Madison) serves as Director of the Institute of Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on ethics, feminist philosophies, race, sexuality, environmental ethics, and art. Assistant Professor of Philosophy Sarah Wright (Ph. D University of Arizona) focuses on epistemology including virtue epistemology. She has a research competence in feminist philosophy and has taught the subject in the department. A number of other faculty members are interested in and supportive of feminist philosophy.

University of Kentucky


At the University of Kentucky, we list at least eight explicitly committed women-supportive feminist-supportive faculty. The Women's Studies Program at the University of Kentucky offers a free-standing Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies. Students accepted for open post-baccalaureate status in the Graduate School may enroll in and
complete the Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies without matriculating for a disciplinary graduate degree.

University of Memphis*


The department offers both the MA and PhD. Five of our sixteen faculty members are women. They are: Pleshette DeArmitt (feminist theory, French feminism and psychoanalysis), Mary Beth Mader (French feminism, feminism and ontology, feminism and evolutionary theory), Sarah Clark Miller (feminist ethics, feminist social and political theory, transnational feminism, feminist legal theory), Deborah Tollefsen (feminist epistemology, history of 17th and 18th century women philosophers) and Nancy Simco (analytic philosophy, contemporary metaphysics, and advanced logic). The department is best known for contemporary Continental philosophy, but encourages philosophical pluralism. Faculty members working in feminist theory employ both continental and analytic perspectives. We also have strengths in African American philosophy and race theory (Bill Lawson and Robert Bernasconi). Faculty members not working in feminist philosophy are generally very supportive of it, as is our department chair (Nancy Simco).

Recent graduate seminars in feminist theory have focused on: multicultural and postcolonial feminisms; feminist ethical, social and political theory; feminist epistemology; feminist theories: Irigaray’s Heidegger; agency, well-being and care; gender and sexuality; and difference and nature in contemporary French philosophy: the human sex dimorphism and related issues. We also have a very active, on-going feminist theory reading group, which in recent semesters has included the writings of Luce Irigaray, Gloria Anzaldúa, bell hooks, Judith Butler, Patricia Hill Collins, Patricia Williams, Hélène Cixous and Michèle LeDoeuff. Other reading groups include
feminist and related perspectives, such as one this past summer on conceptions of solidarity in feminist and race theory.

Many of our MA and PhD students work on themes in feminist philosophy. Multiple doctoral students have written dissertations on feminist theory in recent years. Graduate students also have the option of doing an interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies while in the philosophy program. Other campus resources for students interested in feminist and women’s studies include the Center for Research on Women and the Women’s Studies program which in addition to the Graduate Certificate mentioned above, offers an MA program with concentrations in Inequality and Social Policy or Cultural Studies.

University of Minnesota* ^


Feminist-friendly department with many distinguished alums. Active feminist philosophy graduate student group. Feminist Studies (PhD-granting) graduate program offers graduate Minor: faculty includes philosopher Jacquelyn Zita. Feminist bioethicist Deb DeBruin in Bioethics Center (minor available there as well). Younger ethicists in Phil. Dept. (Sarah Holtman, Valerie Tiberius, and Michelle Mason) all feminist-knowledgeable and feminist-friendly. The University of Minnesota is one of the departments with the longest record of being supportive of feminist philosophy graduate students (alumnae include Nancy Potter, Peg O'Connor, Amy Hilden, Melissa Burchard, Heidi Grasswick, Anne Phibbs, and Lisa Bergin). Several students have done or are doing a graduate minor in Feminist Studies in the Women's Studies department, which is where Jacquelyn Zita is. All grad students have outside members of their dissertation committees and can work with her or with a large number of feminist faculty in a wide range of other departments. The graduate students in Philosophy are about half women; the current first year class is all women. Four out of six recent hires were women, three of whom work in ethics (Sarah Holtman: philosophy of law, political philosophy, and Kant; Michelle Mason: moral philosophy and moral psychology; and Valerie Tiberius: moral philosophy and environmental ethics); although none of them specializes in feminist ethics, all of them are sympathetic, interested, and happy to work with graduate students who do. Current graduate students have organized a new seminar (led by the current chair, Doug Lewis, who has been very active in working with feminist graduate students both as a dissertation supervisor and on projects of transformiing and revising the curriculum), at which a number of faculty will discuss the impact of feminism on their own fields (ethics, aesthetics, history of ancient and of modern philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of social science, and epistemology). Minnesota has a strong Center for Bioethics, with faculty who are members of the Philosophy Graduate faculty, notably Deb DeBruin, who does feminist bioethics, and Carl Elliott, whose work includes issues related to mind and body modification and who has worked with feminist philosophy graduate students interested in, for example, transexual and transgender issues.

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill*


At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, out of 46 graduate students, 24 are women. This year 3 of these received their Ph.D.s and all received tenure-track positions: one to Columbia, one to Michigan State, and one to Tulane with a joint appointment in Women's Studies. All three have taught and will likely teach feminism. Fall 2005 incoming class of 8 includes 5 women. Despite the fact that Carolina has only 4 women on the faculty of 18, our graduate students do very well. This is not to say everything is perfect. We do have a women's brunch once a term to discuss particular issues, and this seems to be a good forum.

University of Oregon*


Faculty at University of Oregon now has 4 women faculty out of 10, putting us at 40%. Women faculty include Naomi Zack (feminism, race, philosophy of science); Beata Stawarsksa (Continental, dialogical philosophy, philosophical psychology, feminism); Bonnie Mann (feminist phenomenology, poststructuralist feminism, feminist materialism), and Erin Cline (ancient Chinese philosophy). One of our male faculty members, Scott Pratt, publishes and teaches in feminist philosophy (feminist pragmatism). At the University of Oregon, feminist philosophy is recognized as a tradition on the level of the Continental, Analytic, and American traditions, even as we recognize that feminist philosophers work in and across other philosophical traditions. We are the only graduate department in the country that we know of which requires PhD students to take 2 courses in feminist philosophy (legacy of Nancy Tuana - thank you Nancy!) Beata Stawarska and I have received significant funding to found a new Society for Interdisciplinary Feminist Phenomenology, which we are launching this year with the help of our wonderful feminist grad students. I think UO is definitely becoming one of the best places to do work in feminism and continental philosophy, expecially if one's emphasis is in phenomenology.
The department is home of the Feminist Philosophy
Research Interest Group, funded by the Center for the Study of Women in Society(a UO feminist research center) which brings prominent feminist thinkers to campus on a regular basis, after sustained engagement with their work. We also have a very lively group of feminist graduate students. Graduate offerings include: Feminist Political Philosophy; Feminism and Aesthetics; Feminist Ethics; Feminism and Phenomenology; Feminist Topics: Sex and Gender (focuses on the debate between poststructuralists and phenomenologists); Simone de Beauvoir; Feminist Pragmatism; and we will likely add a course soon on feminism and psychoanalysis. There are opportunities for graduate fellows to assist in and teach undergraduate courses in feminist philosophy and women's studies.
PhD admission is extremely competitive, but includes 4 years of funding, in some cases 5. Last year we admitted fewer than 5% of applicants.

University of Sheffield* ^


The philosophy department is very supportive of work in feminist philosophy. Although only Jennifer Saul publishes on the subject, 6 other members of staff have either (a) been involved in supervising graduate work on feminism or (b) incorporated feminist philosophy into their courses. In 2005, the department hosted a conference on Gender, Objectification and The Body. There is a long-established feminist philosophy reading group, and interdisciplinary interests can be pursued in the Centre for Gender Studies in Europe and the Social Science Gender Research Network. There is also a Political Theory MA offered jointly with the politcs department (along with MAs, MPhils and PhDs in philosophy.) Finally, although the proportion of female graduate students varies year by year, most of the last 6 years it has been around 50% (out of roughly 50 students).

University of Western Ontario* ^


Notes: The department includes a feminist department chair (Samantha Brennan) and a feminist philosopher as Dean (Kathleen Okruhlik). Other faculty include Tracy Isaacs (ethics, feminist ethics, collective responsibility), Carolyn McLeod (feminism, moral philosophy, and health care ethics), and Helen Fielding (feminism and phenomenology). We currently have graduate fields in moral, political, and legal philosophy as well as philosophy of science and history of philosophy. We are in the process of having graduate fields in philosophy of mind and language, and feminist philosophy recognized by the Ontario College of Graduate Studies. In the past few years we have been host to conferences of the Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy and the Society for Analytical Feminism. We also hosted an independent conference simply called Feminist Moral Philosophy.

University of Wisconsin ^


Notes: Claudia Card on faculty, and the university and the city of Madison offer a sizeable feminist community.

Washington University* ^


The Philosophy Department includes Marilyn Friedman and Larry May in the philosophy department; May’s done work on masculinity, among other things relevant to feminist philosophy. Linda Nicholson, in the history department, is also Director of the Women's Studies Program, which offers a graduate certificate in Women's Studies.

York University


Judy Pelham is chair of the Philosophy Department at York University and under her leadership the department is noticeably becoming a very collegial place to work and study. There is currently a large and active population of female graduate students.